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NASA’s Orion capsule heads for liftoff after Artemis I’s flyby around the moon (Reuters).

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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: NASA’s next-generation moon rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with Orion crew capsule, lifts off from Launch Complex 39-B of the uncrewed Artemis 1 mission to the moon, seen from Sebastian, Florida, United States in November. 16, 2022. REUTE

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Written by Joey Roulette and Steve Gorman

(Reuters) – NASA’s uncrewed Orion capsule hurtled through space Sunday on the final leg of its journey around the moon and back, concluding the inaugural mission of the Artemis lunar program 50 years to the day after the last Apollo moon landing.

The gumdrop-shaped Orion capsule, carrying a simulated crew of three mannequins attached to sensors, was scheduled to parachute into the Pacific Ocean at 9:39 a.m. PST (1739 GMT) near Guadalupe Island, off the Baja Peninsula. Mexican California.

Orion was nearing the end of its 25-day mission less than a week after it passed about 79 miles (127 km) above the moon on a lunar lunar excursion and about two weeks after it reached the farthest point in space, nearly 270,000 miles (434,000 miles). (500 km) from Earth.

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After jettisoning the service module housing its main rocket system, the capsule was expected to re-enter Earth’s atmosphere at 24,500 mph (39,400 kph) — more than 30 times the speed of sound — for a fiery 20-minute dive into the ocean. .

Orion lifted off Nov. 16 from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, atop NASA’s next-generation Space Launch System (SLS), now the world’s most powerful rocket and the largest NASA has built since Apollo’s Saturn V. era.

The first SLS-Orion flight kicked off the Apollo program, Artemis, which aims to return astronauts to the lunar surface this decade and establish a sustainable base there as a jumping-off point for future human exploration of Mars.

Serendipitously, the return of Artemis I to Earth unfolded on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 17 moon landings by Gene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt on December 11, 1972. They were the last of the 12 NASA astronauts to walk on the Moon during totality. of the six Apollo missions beginning in 1969.

Hit a penny with a soccer ball

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Reentry marks the most critical phase of Orion’s flight, testing whether the newly designed heat shield will withstand atmospheric friction expected to raise temperatures outside the capsule to nearly 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit (2,760 degrees Celsius).

“It’s our number one target,” Mike Sarafin, NASA’s Artemis 1 mission manager, said at a news briefing last week. “There is no arc jet or atmospheric thermal facility here on Earth capable of replicating hypersonic reentry with a heat shield of this size.”

It will also test the advanced guidance and propulsion systems used to guide the capsule from the moon to the appropriate re-entry point and through to landing, while keeping the spacecraft at exactly the right angle to avoid burn-up.

“It’s basically like throwing a soccer ball 300 yards and hitting a penny,” said Eric Kaufman, Orion Propulsion senior manager at Lockheed Martin Corp. (NYSE:), which built Orion under a contract with NASA, told Reuters.

The navigation and internal control system commands 12 onboard thrusters, located in recessed positions along the base of the capsule, to fire bursts of fuel as needed to keep the capsule properly oriented and on course, he said.

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hotter and faster

The heat, speed, and forces exerted on Orion upon its return from the Moon would exceed those endured by spacecraft leading to more routine descents from the International Space Station (ISS) or other flights from low Earth orbit.

In another new development, Orion is programmed to employ a new “skip entry” descent in which the capsule briefly dips into the top of the atmosphere, flies out and reenters – a braking maneuver that also provides more control to steer the vehicle closer to its intended target.

NASA officials have stressed the experimental nature of the Artemis I mission, which marks the first launch of Boeing (NYSE: Co-built SLS) and the first combined with Orion, which previously flew a short two-orbit test launch on a smaller Delta IV. Rocket in 2014.

Although the capsule experienced some unexpected communications outages and an electrical problem during its trip around the Moon, NASA has given high marks to both SLS and Orion’s performance so far, boasting that it has exceeded the US space agency’s expectations.

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If Artemis I is deemed successful, a manned Artemis II flight around the Moon and back could come as early as 2024, followed in a few more years by the first lunar landing of the Artemis program, one of them being a woman, with Artemis III.

Compared to Apollo, born of the Cold War-era U.S.-Soviet space race, Artemis is a more science-based, large-scale mover, enlisting commercial partners like Elon Musk’s SpaceX and space agencies in Europe, Canada and Japan.

It also marked a major turning point for NASA, redirecting the human spaceflight program beyond low-Earth orbit after decades of focus on the space shuttles and the International Space Station.

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Red Flags That Your Spouse Is Hiding Money (And What To Do About It)

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Marriage can be hard enough without one spouse hiding money from the other.

When financial infidelity occurs in the form of “hidden cash,” a marriage or a live-forever relationship can easily be ended.

The truth is About 30% of American couples suffer from financial infidelity. Other evidence shows that more than 75% of couples describe the hidden money situation as negative and common 10% of these scenarios end in divorce.

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US judge orders Norwegian Cruise Line to pay $110m for use of Cuba port By Reuters

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© Reuters. Norwegian American Airlines cruise ship Marina arrives in Havana Bay, Cuba on March 9, 2017. REUTERS/Alexander Meneghini/File/File Photo

Written by Brian Ellsworth

MIAMI (Reuters) – Norwegian Shipping Line (NYSE) has to pay $110 million in compensation for the use of a port confiscated by the Cuban government in 1960, a US judge said Friday, marking a significant milestone for Cuban Americans. Who are seeking reparations for the Cold War era. Assets confiscation.

The decision by US District Judge Beth Bloom in Miami follows her decision in March that use of the Havana Cruise Terminal constituted smuggling of forfeited property belonging to the plaintiff, Delaware-registered Havana Docks Corp.

The decision read: “The judgment is made in favor of Plaintiff Havana Docks Corporation and against Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, Ltd.”

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“The plaintiff was awarded $109,848,747.87 in damages,” it says, adding that the Norwegian must also pay an additional $3 million in legal fees and costs.

Norwegian Cruise Line did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel has sharply criticized the Helms-Burton Act, calling it an extraterritorial violation of international law.

Havana Docks also sued Carnival Cruise Lines (NYSE: ), Royal Caribbean (NYSE:) and MSC under the Helms-Burton Act, which allows US citizens to sue over the use of property seized in Cuba after 1959.

The ruling could fuel more lawsuits by Cuban exiles pursuing claims, worth $2 billion, according to one estimate, over asset seizures under late Cuban leader Fidel Castro.

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It may also serve as a reminder to multinational companies of the complexities that can come with doing business in Cuba.

In 2016, US cruise ships began traveling to Cuba for the first time in decades after a détente negotiated by former President Barack Obama eased some provisions of a Cold War US embargo.

But the Trump administration in 2019 ordered a halt to all such cruises amid efforts to pressure Cuba over its support for Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, Washington’s ideological foe.

The Trump administration has also allowed US citizens to sue third parties for using property seized by Cuban authorities, a provision of the Helms-Burton Act that every previous president has waived since the law was passed in 1996.

Havana Docs says Cuba, which has been under a US trade embargo for decades, has never compensated it for taking the drug.

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The four cruise lines sued in 2019 in the US District Court for the Southern District of Florida. Bloom in March held the companies liable for damages under the Helms-Burton Act, also known as the Libertad Act.

According to the US-Cuban Economic and Trade Council, a nonprofit organization that provides information on relations between the two countries, 5,913 validated claims related to property seized in Cuba represent an estimated liability of nearly $2 billion.

Forty-four lawsuits have been filed under Title III of the Helms-Burton Act, the organization says.

“For the current plaintiffs of Cuban descent, (the decision) will give them a moment of relief,” said John Cavulich, the group’s president. “It will give them a moment to say ‘You can run but you can’t hide,’” Cavulich said.

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Is a Royal Caribbean or Carnival beverage package worth it?

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An all-inclusive beverage package that gives you access to beer, wine, liquor, bottled water, soda, specialty coffee, and even shakes/juices may cost more than your cruise fare.

This is especially true right now when many cruise cabins are being sold at discounted prices while the drinks package prices have gone up.

Deciding whether to purchase a drink package is a challenge because you have to estimate whether you will be drinking enough to cover the cost. Or, more importantly, whether you’d spend more if you decided not to purchase a drink package.



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