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Buongiorno from Milan, where I make a quick stop on an autumn tour through Europe for some meetings. It’s the last short window to visit the continent before the U.S. sports schedule really heats up: With league and professional football already under way, baseball playoffs are about to begin, and National Basketball Association The season starts later this month.

It’s true that the NBA preseason alone really does have tongues wagging. Everyone talks about it Victor Wimpanyama, the 18-year-old French player who scored 37 points in his first exhibition match on US soil this week. Speculation is now rife that NBA teams could “stock up” their seasons for the chance of landing a 7’4″ force once in a generation forward in the 2023 draft. And in a league already filled with global stars, a young beacon for France ahead of the 2024 Paris Olympics could to make it a symbol.

This week, we’ve examined two facets of world football, beginning with the signs of life in the zombie apocalypse that is the European Premier League, followed by a statement on the ramifications of a disastrous investigation into abuses in the US women’s professional game. Read on – Sarah Germano, American sports business reporter

Send us tips and comments on Scoreboard@ft.com. Don’t already receive our email newsletter? Participation over here. For anyone else, let’s go.

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Pérez and Agnée look forward to making friends and influencing people

Florentino Pérez: Searching for allies © FT montage; AFP, UEFA via Getty

If you have seen a file Figo affair On Netflix, you’ll know it Florentino Perez It should not be underestimated. In the documentary, which tells the story of the most controversial football transfer in history, Real Madrid The boss appears as someone who can achieve the impossible. And if you haven’t seen it – you really should.

Perez, chief engineer of European Premier League The project, the maneuvers were done. Last Sunday, he addressed the General Assembly of Real Madrid, in which he criticized UEFAaccusing the governing body of providing too much European club football of questionable quality (theme We go deeper here). The result, he said, is a “sick” sport and a loss for fans.

Perez drew comparisons with other sports, noting that football needed to focus more on pitting elite teams against each other (which was the basic premise of ESL). Imagine facing Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer two or three times over the past two decades? Well, that, Perez believes, is what UEFA’s approach amounts to.

“Young people are demanding a high-quality product that unfortunately football does not offer at the present time, because the current competitions as they are designed today do not attract the attention of spectators except in the final stages,” he said.

Not only was this a long moan, it was also the beginning of what seemed like a witch’s attack. Perez called on the football world to work together to craft a new plan to stop the rot. All options are on the table, and no ideas have been rejected. A new multi-tier European League with promotions, relegations and dozens of members is perhaps the basis for restarting ESL. He says the important thing is to start talking.

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What is happening? Perez appears to be courting the allies to launch a fresh attack on UEFA. At the moment, Perez stands with only Barcelona And the Juventus The trio of untouchables bent on demolishing the current system. Definitely, the CEO of Juventus Andrea Agnelli Followed up on Thursday. In a letter to the members, he echoed Perez’s comments, and said the club wanted to start a dialogue about reforming the European game.

The opposition of the trio seems more entrenched than ever. La Liga president Javier Tebas He said Perez was speaking out of “ignorance” and threatening to “kill” the rest of the footballers.

We can expect more positions over the coming days and weeks. A recommendation is due in December from the European Court of Justice on whether UEFA has a monopoly on European football competitions. A full verdict is expected early next year.

Depending on the outcome, the board of directors could be pressured to relinquish some of its powers. ESL bastions are put in place in case this happens.

American women’s soccer: Time to think © AFP via Getty Images

The summit meeting in women’s football was scheduled for last night: the defending champion, European champion lionesses, by hosting current World Cup champions, the United States, for a friendly match at Wembley. Tickets for the upcoming match sold out within 24 hours.

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The match alone would have been a shining example of the growth of the women’s game, had it not been for a report this week commissioned by Football Detailing the widespread and systematic violations in the domestic professional league, the Women’s National Football League.

The independent investigation, conducted by former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates and including more than 200 interviews, found extensive accounts of verbal and emotional abuse, as well as sexual misconduct, within women’s football at all levels.

The report found that “abuse in the Women’s National Football League is rooted in a deeper culture in women’s football, beginning with the youth leagues, which normalizes verbally abusive training and blurs the lines between coaches and players.” Authorities in the sport have not only “repeatedly failed to respond appropriately when faced with player reports and evidence of abuse, but also failed to take basic measures to prevent and address it.”

The fallout from the report’s findings has been fast and escalating: The Portland Thorns have fired two senior executives, and team owner Merritt Paulson (son of former US Treasury Secretary Hank) has said he is stepping down from day-to-day operations. Arnim Whistler, owner of Chicago Red Stars, also resigned from NWSL’s governance duties, and the team’s board of directors voted to remove him as president.

Abuse scandals, unfortunately, are unheard of in sports. But the extent of the damage within the Women’s National Football League, the most competitive professional league in women’s football, could pose a threat to its viability. Previous iterations of women’s soccer in the United States collapsed amid chaos and mismanagement. NWSL itself is only 10 years old.

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Even more worrisome is the speed with which the Women’s National Football League was created – with the goal of capitalizing on the strong popularity of the 2012 US Women’s Olympic gold – which may be linked to the failure to stop the abuse. The Yates report found that the NFL “has performed limited financial reward actions on potential owners of the new league and did not put in place the necessary infrastructure or planning to support the league in the long-term.”

Other stakeholders have failed to mitigate allegations of abuse, directly due to lack of funding. The Yates report found that the independent watchdog nonprofit that many US sports have entrusted with investigating allegations of abuse, SafeSport, “employs nearly thirty investigators to cover 11 million athletes” — only 8% of cases were referred to SafeSport during the one-year period that reached to an official decision.

For the most part, NWSL sponsors and team sponsors have yet to withhold their support, though Yates’ report is just the first of two expected investigations; The NWSL and its players’ union have commissioned their own independent report, which is still being released.

So far, the players are not satisfied. Before Friday’s friendly match in London, US captain and defender Thorns Becky Soerbrunn She said He was not sure that the current institution could be changed. “I don’t know if the right people are there to do what’s needed,” she said.

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Less than a month left before us Sports Business Summit in New York on October 24. Milwaukee Bucks Owner Mark Lasry and Philadelphia 76ers Owner Josh Harris will be among those who share their thoughts. As a Scoreboard subscriber, you can claim your free digital visit with promo code Premium22 and purchase access to personal VIP discussions and drinks reception. Register for your pass today.

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Highlights

Lars Windhorst: Abroad in Berlin © AP
  • Lars Windhurst He said he would ending Share with German football Hertha Berlinafter the financier was revealed in a Financial Times report that he had hired corporate spies to fire the club’s president.

  • The Indian Premier League‘s Rajasthan Royals Say They are ready to be losers Throughout her “many years” in her international projects, she defended her expansion in response to criticism that the Twenty20 Championship was weakening the international game.

  • Elliott management Suddenly she found herself in control of Italian Serie AHe was once great but sick AC Milan In 2018. After a series of managerial and sporting changes on and off the field, the hedge fund managed to revive the club’s fortunes, a story rich in detail in the Latest FT Scoreboard movie.

  • Leaf golf he is in fishing for a US broadcast partner to do its events. But the Saudi-backed project has so far struggled to find one, despite being home to many of the game’s best talent.

  • More drama from the world chess. A report released this week indicated that 19-year-old Hans Niemann, who recently beat the game’s best player, has They cheated in over 100 online games.

final out

Aaron Judge: Swinging in the history books © AP

The Major League Baseball The regular season wrapped up this week in a dramatic fashion like New York Yankees sweeper Aaron Judge scored his 62nd home run this year in the penultimate game. The feat is an MLS record, eclipsing the record set by fellow Yankee Roger Maris in 1961 of 61 times in a single season. Within baseball, there is debate over whether Judge’s AL record is a more realistic achievement, achieved outside of the steroid era that Barry Bonds Set the all times sign to 73 homers. The banter continues, but for now, savor the call – and the opposing Texas Rangers fans’ response – as the judge made history over here.

Scoreboard authored by Josh Noble, Samuel Agni and Arash Masoudi in London, Sarah Germano, James Fontanella Khan and Anna Nicolau in New York, with contributions from the team producing the due diligence publication, the Financial Times’ global network of reporters and data. visualization team

Cryptofinance Scott Chipolina is filtering out the noise of the global cryptocurrency industry. Participation over here

without hedge Robert Armstrong explains the most important market trends and discusses how the best minds on Wall Street respond to them. Participation over here


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Nick Bollettieri, tennis coach, 1931-2022

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After young Andre Agassi wins an important match while wearing jeans, make-up and earrings, his coach Nick Bollettieri summons him to appear in front of 200 classmates at his tennis academy. As punishment for “defiling” the Center of Excellence, Agassi was sentenced to flush all of the toilets on site. In the next tournament, his coach threatened him that he would have to play in a skirt.

Few people can claim to have produced more champions than “The Michelangelo of Tennis”. Agassi, Jim Courier, Monica Seles, Maria Sharapova and the Williams sisters all trained under pioneering coach Bollettieri, who has died at the age of 91.

In the late 1970s, Politieri pioneered the creation of the Living Academy for young athletes aspiring to achieve greatness. But his methods were as notorious as they were innovative. He would stand bare-chested on the field, berating his young subjects for every stray shot or mis-slashed fist, as they would repeat the same actions thousands of times.

The vision was to bring the best young players together in one place where they could “play, break rackets, gamble, fight, bat”. Students were forbidden to watch television, listen to the radio, eat junk food, or call home during the week. The misdemeanor penalty in court includes forced running without water. But at the end of each practice session, the kids would step in front of their teacher uttering the catchphrase, “Thank you, Nick.”

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In his academic diaries, Agassi described it as “a glorified concentration camp. Not all that glorified.” However, those aiming for the summit continued to pour in there. And despite Pollettieri’s reputation as abrasive and obsessive—he got up every morning at 4:30 a.m. to stretch and lift weights—many of those he taught speak of him affectionately as a surrogate parent. They also became winners. Of the tens of thousands of players who had trained under him, ten would reach the world number one rank.

“I was living my dream,” Sharapova, who joined the academy at the age of eight, said. he told the Financial Times in 2015. “I saw all these great champions come and train. I would wake up every morning and I couldn’t wait for my alarm to go off at 6.30am and go get my lesson.”

Bollettieri and Andre Agassi in 1988 after winning on the field in New York © Caryn Levy / Sports Illustrated / Getty Images

Nicholas James Bollettieri was born in 1931 in Pelham, New York. His parents were Italian immigrants. He was the quarterback on the football team in high school, before his uncle convinced him to try out the “sneaky sport of tennis”.

After studying philosophy in college in Alabama, Politieri joined the army, became a paratrooper and reached the rank of lieutenant. His time in the army would be central to his coaching ethos later in life. He said, “I started to learn a lot being a parachutist—the discipline, the feeling that you’re the best in the world, that you can do anything.”

After leaving the military in 1957, he enrolled to study law at the University of Miami. To help make ends meet, he began offering tennis lessons at $1.50 an hour, despite having no experience as a coach and no more than that as a player. Less than a year later, he gave up his studies to devote himself to tennis.

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“A lot of coaches know tennis a lot more than I do,” he said. “What I do know is how to work with you as a person.”

In 1961, he discovered Brian Gottfried, who was then nine years old, on the field and took him under his wing. Gottfried would later become Bollettieri’s first hit, reaching No. 3 in the world in 1977.

That same year, after a stint teaching wealthy hotel clients to play tennis, he landed at Colony Beach & Tennis Resort near Sarasota, Florida. A year later, he founded the Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy.

He went on to borrow $1 million to transform his 40-acre tomato plants in Bradenton, Florida, into a sprawling tennis training camp that opened in 1981. Agassi referred to his time there as “a forehand master of the flies,” but he attended for free. His father only had money to pay for three months’ tuition, but Bollettieri called him to say he was “tearing up the check” after seeing how good he was. The pair suffered an emotional split in 1993, shortly after Agassi won the first of his eight Grand Slam titles.

Bollettieri was known for his money management problems. With financial problems looming, he sold the Academy to IMG in 1987. But he continued to run it.

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Today the site covers approximately 600 acres, and teaches a wide range of sports to the 1,200 full-time residents and thousands more children and adults who attend sports camps there. In 2014, Politieri was inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame, one of only four coaches to receive the award.

Josh Noble

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Ads disappear as Google Ad Manager crashes for a while

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Netizens watched an ad-free web for several hours Thursday night.

8:04 p.m. EST, The Google Spread It was “investigating reports of a problem with Google Ad Manager”. While users can enter the program, they “see error messages, high response time, and/or other unexpected behavior.”

Most importantly, ads were not displayed, which means that users did not see ads on the websites of companies using Google Ad Manager. “Ads Manager is not serving ads to affected users,” Google wrote in the incident report.

A few hours later, at 10:40 PM EST, Google said That the problem has been resolved, writing “Ad display is now restored”.

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Google didn’t share any information about the extent of the outage in its post, but users on social media speculated it could be global, with customers in the US, Canada and Japan Report Twitter Ad manager was not working.

Google Ads Manager is a program digital marketplace Where customers can buy and sell ads across multiple networks. The service is mostly used by large publishers who are involved in direct sales to ad buyers. Over 80% of large publishers say they use Google Ad Manager to manage their ad sales.

Other Google advertising services appear to be running. The search giant doesn’t report issues with AdSense or AdMob, its ad services tailored to small websites and mobile developers respectively.

Advertising is a major part of Google’s business. Google earned 54.48 billion dollars From advertising sales in the third quarter of this year’s total revenue of $ 69.09 billion.

Update, December 9, 2022: This article has been updated with the news that Google has resolved the issue with Google Ad Manager.

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This analyst says AT&T stock is now a buy. Growth potential is the reason.

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AT&T

It had a strong year, and is now on track for “long-term sustainable growth,” according to Argus Research.

Analyst Joseph Bonner promoted shares

AT&T

(Stock ticker: T) To buy from the hold and set a target price of $24 per share. Bonner writes that the company has strong growth potential because of its competitive position and its performance in the current macroeconomic environment.

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